Across the earth, how we interact with food has changed dramatically over time from place-based and face-to-face trading systems to a global industrial food system. This has profoundly impacted our relationship with our foods, with each other and with our environment. In the Capital Region, traditional food systems that were sustained for thousands of years have quickly shifted to become part of a global industrial food system.  There is a mounting body of research and evidence of the negative ecological, social, health and economic consequences of these changes. 

The Regional Food Systems Report 2016 outlines these impacts and sets out a common agenda for some of the key outcomes that we would like to see to improve our community's health and well-being, ensure equitable access to food, for all and build greater resilience into the local food economy. The report also provides some direction as to how we might track and monitor change over time based on a set of indicators.   

We feel a deep responsibility to our communities and to future generations to rebuild our relationship to our foods, to the earth and to each other. There is great opportunity to nurture and grow the interest in and resources and momentum for “Good Food" - food that is good for the planet, the producer, and the health and well-being of all.